Archive for ‘In The Media’

April 30, 2011

Social Media Profession Saturation?

Is the profession of social media becoming competitively saturated?

Early adoption of social media led to great communicators becoming industry leaders as social media professionals.

Communicational icons, such as Amber Naslund, Brian Solis, Paul Barron and Chris Brogan sprinted out of the gate, blazing a new industry called social media.

As the growth of social media has exploded, giving rise to official professional associations such as Social Media Club and educational programs such as “boot camps” and Portland State University’s Digital Marketing Strategies Certificate, leaders in this industry – the true professionals – have eschewed monikers such as “guru”, distancing themselves from too-narrowly focused “ninjas” and those out for a quick buck.

In a conversation last week with a significant franchisee of Papa Murphy’s Pizza brand (with tens of locations and direct corporate HQ relationship), it was shared that they are approached three or more times a week by so-called social media professionals, offering to “build them a Facebook fanpage”. The franchisee laughed in frustration, stating they had established a strong gate-keeper, because nearly all of these approaches were unable to provide the metrics ability businesses require.

On another front, the critique of traditional public relations and marketing firms was heavy over the last few years – that they didn’t “get” social media. With these traditional communication providers unable to advantage social media for their clients, the clients turned to either outsourcing or handling it themselves. As recently as December 2010, I was approached by a national public relations firm seeking a statement of Chalkboarder’s social media abilities – that they could subcontract for the benefit of their clients. Many of these communication firms have now put serious investment into gaining that social media knowledge in the last 18 months.

My question is this: as traditional public relations and marketing firms increasingly offer skilled social media services to their clients, does this reduct the opportunities for other talented communication/social media professionals? Are brands going to return to their public relations/marketing firms that they have had prior relationships with and eschew social media professionals that “got it” early on? Is the industry becoming crowded? Is there value to membership in a social media professional association like Social Media Club versus more traditional associations like the American Marketing Association or Public Relations Society of America?

An additional question would be – how can brands determine the true reach and effectiveness of social media service providers?

Jeffrey J Kingman, CEO – Chalkboarder

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December 19, 2010

Presenting in the Ignite Style

A Different Way to Present Concept


This past month, I was invited to participate in Portland State University’s Digital Marketing Conference Ignite presentations. Having never presented in the Ignite style, I decided to research effective methods of communicating in this presentational mode.

For those of you who have never done nor seen an Ignite presentation, it works like this. Presenters get five minutes for their topic and provide twenty powerpoint slides. The slides are assembled into one combined presentation and they auto-flip every fifteen seconds.

This means, as the presenter, that you can’t control the advancing of your topic slides – they change every fifteen seconds. Talk about presenter pressure! I already knew that I wanted to talk some smack to the USA restaurant industry and did some research through Google and YouTube on effective Ignite presenting skills.

The key lessons I learned from this research (which caused me to chuck my first draft) were these:

  • Go thematic. When preparing your presentation, stay in a generalized topic, meaning, don’t try to push a lot of details.
  • Use imagery. The slides are there to reinforce what you are speaking too.
  • Put tiny clues into your slides to keep you on topic; maybe one or two trigger words.
  • Be a storyteller. Structure your five minutes like you were telling a story to peers at happy hour.
  • Stay away from a bulletized presentation style.
  • Practice, practice, practice. Stand in front of bright lights when you practice. Don’t worry about messing up – in fact, what counts is your ability to recover if you get stuck.

Here is the Youtube video of my Ignite presentation at PSU’s Digital Marketing Conference 2010. I planned my target audience to include social media, as a way to get exposure for Chalkboarder. Mind you, by mid-way through my presentation, my microphone hand was noticeably shaking. It had been nearly thirty years since I was on a stage that size with lights that bright.

Another of my favorite presenters from the day…

Paul Ting: Add Some Australianisms to Your Social Media

I want to give props to everyone who organized and ran Portland State University’s Digital Marketing Conference, especially those involved in producing the Ignite Series. They all worked supremely hard to deliver professional results.

Here are all the other links to the Ignite presentations from that day:

Jennifer Wakayama: Ugly Kitchen Contest
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Andy Van Oostrum: A Planning Framework for Personalization
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Don Bourassa: Location Based Services for Great Advertising
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Kim Stetson: Digital Organization
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Mary Nichols: Social Media for Product Development
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Matt Selbie: Customer Retention & Marketing
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David Smith: Convert Listening to Revenue
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Taylor Ellwood: Imagine Your Reality Business & Social Media
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Charlie Levenson: Everything I Learned About User Experience
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Bret Bernhoft: Free Tools
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Ayleen Crotty: Customer Superstars
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Jennifer Hancox: Digital Marketing for Restaurants & Bars
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Jeff Simmons: Grassroots Marketing Through Social Media
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Lydia Smith: One Path, Many Ways: The Camino Documentary
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Siouxsie Jennett: Google Adwords vs Facebook Ads
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Mark Brundage:  Building Communities to Create Growth
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Mark Wills: Everything You Need to Know About SEO
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Kent Lewis: A Path to Retirement Using Social Media
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Kate Ertmann: 3D Trends Marketers Need to Care About
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Rhiannon West Chamberlain: Social Media & Travel

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Everyone did a fantastic presentation. I believe for most, it was our first Ignite experience.

November 9, 2010

The Artful Element of Creative Surprise

Bald, bold and brash creativity in being competitive. How many businesses operate a competitive posture like this coach and football team?

How many small and medium sized businesses think “out-of-box” to gain big results?

 

July 28, 2010

NEIGHBORHOOD WATCH Using Social Media to Monitor Your Competition

By Jeffrey J Kingman, CEO Chalkboarder, written for and published by Inside F&B Magazine.

Most Chefs and Restaurateurs are strong competitors. Our restaurant communities may be full of camaraderie and industry friendships but, like street pickup basketball games on the corner, we’re highly competitive. We wouldn’t put in 60 to 100 hour weeks if we weren’t.

Every strong competitor has highly developed situational awareness and observation skills. Along our careers in hospitality, our coaches, the industry trainers and mentors, honed these competitive skills in us repeatedly. Today, in the new era of Web 4.0, the competitive advantages of using social media include discovering what others are saying right now about your competition and your operation, staying on top of your competition’s latest news, and ruthless as it sounds, reaching out to your competitor’s dissatisfied guests to invite them to your place.

As much as we work hard to train staff, execute creative and effective team leadership and positively surmount daily organizational challenges, we also have to have our eyes and….

To finish reading the article please visit it here at Inside F&B Magazine.

June 29, 2010

Chalkboarder’s New Look..

We launched a new look to Chalkboarder yesterday, reformatting our main site (here) and re-launching another site Chalkboarder News.

Chalkboarder 2010

Chalkboarder News is our company and client newswire service. We’re sharing everything we post for our clients (and for us) there as it happens. We’d love for you to check it out and if you wish to stay abreast of current developments, please subscribe or RSS feed.

We’re using our main site here to discuss relationship engineering, social media, the evolution of the social web, customer service, organizational sustainability, brand concept and development and my favorite topic – building and nurturing organizational villages.

Our relationship engineering team includes Bill Bridgmon (VP Sales), Matthew Vitorla (NE Reg Sales), Jennifer Collins (SE Reg Sales), Judith Smith (Editor) and myself. I anticipate you’ll see an noticeable uptick in activity here at Chalkboarder.

Jeffrey

June 26, 2010

An Apology to the Dessert Professional Community

Open Letter of Apology

I have a personal and professional apology to make.

Yesterday I attended the open house grand opening of Water Avenue Coffee in Portland, Oregon. I have been witness to the process my friends Bruce and Matt Milletto and the Bellissimo Coffee InfoGroup/American Barista Coffee School have been through to birth a coffee roastery and roasting school with coffee bar for several months now.

While there, Brandon, their head roaster, knowing my background as a fine-dining executive chef, shared with me a cup of coffee truly fantastic. He had taken green Sumatran beans and stored them in old oak wine barrels for two weeks, then roasted them.

In blunt honesty, this cup of coffee is the best coffee I have ever tasted. I got really excited about it.

In my excitement, I sent out a tweet from several Twitter accounts; @jeffreyjkingman, @coffeefestshow, @chalkboarder and from my client Dessert Professional Magazine‘s account @dessertpro. My failure is this – I used the acronym “OM*G” in the message.

To all the followers of @dessertpro and to any other followers of the other accounts who are offended by the use of this acronym, I deeply and sincerely apologies. I most definitely did not mean to offend with my excitement. My passion as a culinarian and gourmand spilled over.

I appreciate that a couple of you following @dessertpro took the time to call the magazine’s office to complain. The energy expended in doing so I cannot repay, but it indicates that you care about Dessert Professional Magazine. To Matthew Stevens, Tish Boyle and the rest of the staff at Dessert Professional, my sincerest apologies for mis-representing your brand.

Please feel free to message me anytime about content that I distribute over any social network, from my accounts, Chalkboarder’s accounts or any of our clients accounts.

Most sincerely,

Jeffrey J Kingman
CEO, Chalkboarder

March 10, 2010

Client Case Study: Coffee Fest

This past weekend Chalkboarder headed over to Meadowlands NJ to provide social media coverage of Coffee Fest’s first of three 2010 tradeshows. We were fortunate to meet some truly outstanding people within the specialty coffee and tea industry, from growers and suppliers, to roasters, coffee/tea shop owners and baristas. There seemed to be a fair number of folks attending who were planning to open a coffee/tea house.

Coffee Fest NYC Barista Competitor Megan's Signature Drink

Our mission at the Show was to journalize – to capture as much of the activity as we could to share with the friends of Coffee Fest and hopefully – that they would then share the high energy of Coffee Fest with their communities.

We’ve got some blogging to do – some retrospectives of the show. We were able to capture a large number of videos, create a Youtube Channel for Coffee Fest and engage a lot of the attendees and exhibitors through Twitter.

You can find all the videos over here at Coffee Fest Youtube, search the Twitter archives by using the hashtag #coffeefest, and stay tuned for the blog postings over here on Jeffrey Kingman’s Leaf & Berry Blog.

January 27, 2010

Brave New World

Illustration by Kathy Boake

A great article on how foodservice and hospitality operations can use social media, written for the Canadian hospitality industry by author Lesley Young for Foodservice World Magazine.

FH 01 10_BraveNewWorld

She quotes our CEO Jeffrey J Kingman in several places.